Items filtered by date: July 2013

Why Congress Should Be Worried About the Endoplasmic Reticulum

Morphogenesis in biology always fascinated me. As a developmental neurobiologist at the bench, I studied how homeobox genes patterned the neural epithelium, the retina in particular, to understand the events that turn a flat sheet of epithelium into a three-dimensional hemisphere, the optic cup. Since I came of age scientifically during the “genetic revolution” era, I was mesmerized by the ability of that technology to alter the mouse genome and allow me to watch powerful genes operating in vivo. However, I also had at the back of my mind an idea for a different if complementary approach to genetics. I envisioned a new kind of theoretical modeling that could take into account the physical forces acting on single cells while shaping a developing tissue. In particular, when imagining the retina’s formation, I always thought of the role of mechanical forces on cells, bending the epithelium sheet into an optic cup, and how this must be achieved with the lowest possible energy consumption.

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The Perils of Reviewing Peer Review

As a recovering federal employee, I recognize that one of the biggest challenges the government faces in funding science is that of being truly Darwinian in a rapidly evolving scientific environment. Engineering natural selection doesn’t come easily to government funding agencies, which are often playing with one hand behind the back.

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Within the Genome: All One and All Different

On  a recent hot Sunday afternoon, my eight-year-old son, Davide, and I left “the girls” (mom and four-year-old daughter) at home to embark on a field trip to the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History on the National Mall in Washington, DC. We were going to visit a science exhibit celebrating the 10th anniversary of the human genome sequencing.1,2 It turned out to be one of my best Sundays in quite a while!

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The Story of WI-38, the Other Famous Cell Line

Recently, a news feature published in the journal Nature caught my attention. I was pleased to read such an insightful piece on a key issue for cell biologists—the ethical and effective use of human tissues and cells. Credit goes to science reporter Meredith Wadman who took a closer look at the intriguing “back story” behind a rather famous cell line, WI-38, that was established in 1962 by Leonard Hayflick at the virology powerhouse of the day, the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia1. The twists and turns of the WI-38 story are complex, and I strongly encourage followers of this blog to read Wadman’s feature article, which sets out the facts clearly and yet doesn't duck the implications.

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ASCB Kaluza Prize Reflects ASCB’s Concern that Young Scientists Are Now a Vulnerable Population

ASCB Kaluza Prize Reflects ASCB’s Concern that Young Scientists Are Now a Vulnerable Population

The ASCB Kaluza Prize recognizes significant research achievement by early career scientists who still pursue excellence amidst economic uncertainties and political shortsightedness. ASCB Photo.In the...

11-20-2013

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Round Trip from Stockholm to ASCB

Round Trip from Stockholm to ASCB

With Stockholm still in the future, Randy Schekman (third from left) with fellow 2013 Nobel winner, Jim Rothman (far right), shared the ASCB's highest scientific honor, the E. B. Wilson Medal, with St...

11-06-2013

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Colliding Worlds—A Rare Visit to the CERN Collider Gives a Biologist New Hope

Colliding Worlds—A Rare Visit to the CERN Collider Gives a Biologist New Hope

Nearly 170 meters beneath CERN, ASCB Executive Director Stefano Bertuzzi gets a rare look at the Large Hadron Collider. Here he stands in front of the detector. Photo Credit: ASCBLast week, I was invi...

10-23-2013

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Watching Train Wrecks

Watching Train Wrecks

It’s full steam ahead for disaster or will the brakes stop the runaway fiscal crisis train in time? Photo by John FleischmanAlong with the future of U.S. research science, the train wreck metaphor has...

10-16-2013

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UPDATED-NIH Furloughs to Widen—From Slowdown to Shutdown, U.S. Science Takes a Hit

UPDATED-NIH Furloughs to Widen—From Slowdown to Shutdown, U.S. Science Takes a Hit

The USDA is closed and no U.S. orders for international fruit flies can be processed until the government is back in business.Photo Credit: André KarwathUUPDATED—The "Activation Energy" blog has learn...

10-09-2013

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Shutting Down Basic Science—Some Thoughts at Midnight (no, this is not a fairy tale)

Shutting Down Basic Science—Some Thoughts at Midnight (no, this is not a fairy tale)

Last night at midnight, the government ran out of money and shut down its main operations. Sadly, it left me wondering if perhaps our democracy ran out of steam as well. I've tried to explain what is ...

10-01-2013

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New Partners and New Ventures for ASCB in Science Education Reform

New Partners and New Ventures for ASCB in Science Education Reform

In a 2012 Science editorial, Bruce Alberts, a former ASCB president who was then the journal's editor, urged professional societies to team up in leading innovation in science education. ASC...

09-25-2013

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The Scholarly Paper That No One Will Want to Read Is Being Written in Congress

The Scholarly Paper That No One Will Want to Read Is Being Written in Congress

Spelling It Out: Spending on basic research has increased our longevity and the quality of that longer life. Photo Credit: John FleischmanThis week, a paper in the American Journal of Public Health, a...

09-18-2013

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A Scientist-Senator with a Seat — and a Vote — for Life

A Scientist-Senator with a Seat — and a Vote — for Life

I recently spent some time on a family vacation in Italy. We have a tradition in our family; at the dinner table, each of us has to say the best and the worst thing that happened to him or her during ...

09-10-2013

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Showing the Faces of Science

Showing the Faces of Science

In 2011, the Nobel Foundation awarded its prize of prizes to cell biologist, immunologist, and longtime ASCB member Ralph Steinman. When the foundation tried calling to deliver the good news, no one p...

09-05-2013

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Lessons from a Society of Societies

Lessons from a Society of Societies

This week, ASCB went to ASAE, or rather five ASCB staffers and yours truly attended a meeting of the ASAE in Atlanta. ASCB, I trust you know, stands for the American Society for Cell Biology. The ASAE...

08-07-2013

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Why Congress Should Be Worried About the Endoplasmic Reticulum

Why Congress Should Be Worried About the Endoplasmic Reticulum

Morphogenesis in biology always fascinated me. As a developmental neurobiologist at the bench, I studied how homeobox genes patterned the neural epithelium, the retina in particular, to understand the...

07-30-2013

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