When I took the MBL Physiology course in Woods Hole, MA, in 2008, I couldn't have anticipated how powerfully it would stoke my passion for science. It was an unforgettable experience; techniques, frameworks, and values from the course continue to shape my scientific identity today.

Published in COMPASS Points

When you look at elementary school students, do you see the next generation of scientists, or tiny terrors to shoo away from lab equipment? Trepidation aside, bringing kids into the lab can be a great means of community outreach. It could not only inspire future researchers; it also shows the nonscientific community (both children and parents) what labs and scientists are really like.

Published in COMPASS Points

I conducted my first experiment in my parents' kitchen when I was eight years old. It involved an apple, a bunch of different spices, and an incubator in the form of the dark, slightly warm environment otherwise known as "under the sink." I had just learned in school about famous world explorers scouring the globe in search of spices and gold. Some spices, like salt, were desirable not only for flavor but also for preservation of food, so I thought: What an idea! Spices can preserve food? What if I cut up an apple and put different spices on each piece? And so, a scientific pursuit ensued.

Published in COMPASS Points
Friday, 03 January 2014 00:00

Six Uses for Old Posters

With the Annual Meeting behind us, thousands of ASCB posters are now floating around the world. If my colleagues are representative, most of those posters are now either in a recycling bin somewhere or keeping scientists toasty at a "lab bonfire." But what if they could be used for something more interesting? Here are some ideas for giving your posters a second life.

Published in COMPASS Points
Friday, 27 December 2013 00:00

Meet COMPASS

Working with faceless beings hidden inside my computer for more than six months was surprisingly easy and productive. Yeah, at the beginning I wondered, what does she or he sound or look like? Then, over time, their Google images became their faces. Which is really weird, I have to admit, since some of them have flowers or random non-human photos as their images. But those are the mental images I learned to associate with my fellow COMPASS members. So when I walked into the COMPASS get-together at the ASCB Annual Meeting, I was excited, yet a little nervous, to finally meet my COMPASS colleagues in person.

Published in COMPASS Points
Friday, 13 December 2013 00:00

Jazzed Up Career Resources in New Orleans

The COMPASS Career Subcommittee is truly excited to bring a bevy of helpful resources to the annual meeting this year. We have given a lot of thought to what students and postdocs like ourselves want, regardless of whether we're in the beginning, middle, or end of our training. The offerings this year include one-on-one career coachingCV reviewdiscussion tables and networking sessions with popular employers of life science PhDs.

Published in COMPASS Points
Friday, 06 December 2013 00:00

COMPASS Events at the ASCB Annual Meeting

While COMPASS has been busy year-round, many of our programs are leading up to the Annual Meeting, coming up in just a couple of weeks. The full program is available online, and you can also download a convenient mobile app for Android and iPhone/iPad.

Published in COMPASS Points

The ASCB wants to create new opportunities for members' participation. Currently, most members participate by attending the Annual Meeting, where they present exciting new data, develop collaborations, and learn more about cell biology. However, this is not the only thing the ASCB offers to its members. The ASCB organizes multiple events and activities during the whole year, and we need people to know about them.

Published in COMPASS Points

With the advent of smartphones and tablets, bringing movies to poster sessions is becoming more common than ever before. Even so, a low-tech flip book is still a lot more fun for visitors to use, and it's easier to pass around a large group. When the session's over, a flip book can live at your bench indefinitely, ready for visitors with no boot time.

Published in COMPASS Points
Friday, 22 November 2013 00:00

What If You Want to be a Postdoc Forever?

Jim started his postdoc 15 years ago and never left. He loves working at the bench, publishes regularly, and has a great relationship with his principal investigator (PI). But Jim hates writing grants, and didn't want to leave behind his technical expertise. A few years ago, Jim's PI secured him a promotion as a research associate so he can continue the work that he loves. Plus, Jim's PI can keep him as a valuable member of the research team. Jim's family also benefits from the arrangement, as he lives close to his aging parents, who can continue to spend time with their grandkids.

Published in COMPASS Points
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