Kenyi Saito-Diaz

Kenyi Saito-Diaz

Kenyi Saito-Diaz is a graduate student in Ethan Lee's lab at Vanderbilt University. He is interested in the regulation of signaling pathways and the crosstalk occurring between them. Also, as an international student, he is interested in helping fellow international students and postdocs in their careers.

There are always times when we need some extra help in the classroom—in finding new ways to engage students or to encourage them to learn about a new topic, for example. iBioEducation from iBiology provides tools that can help enrich your students' learning experience. It doesn't matter if you are a teaching a graduate class, an undergraduate class, or a high school class; there is something for everyone.

To be the best, you have to learn from the best. And, what if you want access to the very best biology information on-demand? Easy—go to iBioSeminars.

On a cold morning in Nashville, Tennessee, Ron Vale, professor at the University of California San Francisco, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator, recalls the story of the beginnings of iBiology. Vale's inspiration for iBiology dates back to 2006 while he was on a trip to India. Vale had the chance to talk to around 120 people from some of the country's leading scientific institutions. However, he kept thinking about the people who didn't have a chance to come to his talks. So he started to "think of new ways for people who are not in leading institutions to also have access to leading scientists" he said.

James Watson became interested in science because of bird migration. He was six years old. Many years later he was awarded a Nobel Prize for discovering the double-helix structure of DNA. What happened in between? Martin Chalfie was studying the genes required for touch sensitivity in C. elegans. And then he was awarded a Nobel Prize for developing GFP as a biomarker. How did he come up with that idea?

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