Celldance 2013, ASCB's Really Useful Cell Biology Video Contest, has engineered a truly simple PDF download of the "Mad Mice" poster. Suitable for high-resolution color printers or screen savers, the "Mad Mice" poster serves a double purpose—it will make your lab bench or office space pop (graphically) and it reminds you to enter your short video that illustrates a basic cell mechanism or process by October 31.

Published in ASCB Post
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:26

#WeAreResearch Contest

ASCB needs your face, your voice, and your creativity to show Congress that basic research has a human dimension. We want a group portrait of you and your labmates to share during our science advocacy days on the Hill and with our Facebook followers. And #WeAreResearch is making this a contest or rather two contests, with prizes—some for you but all for the good of American science and health.

Published in ASCB Post
Wednesday, 21 August 2013 16:14

Sequestration: Journal of a Fiscal Plague Year

America's uncontrolled experiment in eyes-closed sequestration of research funding has George F. Will of the Washington Post worried. With the National Institutes of Health (NIH) now enforcing cuts of 5% or $1.55 billion, Will has declared sequestration, "a public health hazard." Will writes, "NIH scientists seek intensely practical, meaning preventive and therapeutic, things that can save society more than any sequester can."

Published in ASCB Post

The NIH is building its portfolio in the emerging field of extracellular RNAs, known as exRNAs, with the announcement of $17 million in awards to support basic research aimed at understanding this newly discovered type of cell-to-cell interaction. NIH believes that exRNAs could play a role in numerous conditions, including cancer, heart disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The Extracellular RNA Collaborative is a trans-NIH initiative, linking the efforts of five NIH institutes in pushing basic research into exRNAs.

Published in ASCB Post

There are more legendary places in science—Newton's apple tree or the bathtub of Archimedes—but of the real ones, there could be few more famous or harder to find than Thomas Hunt Morgan's Fly Room at Columbia University. This is the room where in 1910 Morgan and his students discovered "white" or w, the first sex-linked mutation in Drosophila melanogaster. Here began the modern era of quantitative biology and genetics. For a limited time, you can visit an uncanny version of the Fly Room itself, but only if you hurry to Brooklyn, NY.

Published in ASCB Post

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has negotiated an agreement with the family of Henrietta Lacks, the African-American woman who died of cervical cancer in 1951 and from whom the famous cell line, HeLa, was derived. The agreement will provide researchers controlled access to the full HeLa genome, through a review group of physicians, scientists, a bioethicist, and Lacks family members, according to a report in Nature and other news media.

Published in ASCB Post

The inhabitants inside the Washington Beltway love secrets. They love knowing them, they love keeping them, they love letting people know they know them, and they love reading them after someone else has leaked them to a reporter. One Beltway resident recalls a neighbor's garden party where a fellow guest announced that she would have to kill her listener if she were to reveal where she worked. "I'm still not sure if she was serious or not," the party goer recalls somewhat nervously.

Given Inner Washington's passion for secrets, it is curious that the House of Representatives' secret task force on immigration reform has apparently disappeared without a trace.

Published in ASCB Post

President Obama announced Wednesday the nominations of France Anne Cordova, an astrophysicist and former president of Purdue University, to become Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and of Yale microbiologist and science education reformer Jo Handelsman to be the Associate Director for Science in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP).

Published in ASCB Post

Fit an iPad with a powerful magnifying objective and what do you get? A rugged, diagnostic-quality microscope that can instantly make cell biology come alive for schoolchildren in New Orleans. ASCB is teaming with Dan Fletcher's Bioengineering group at the University of California, Berkeley, which created the original instrument, to place a set of 10 CellScopes newly adapted to work with iPads, in a city classroom. ASCB members have already kicked in $3,800 toward the $15,000 cost of the first set for New Orleans.

cellscopeA rugged, diagnostic-quality CellScope
that can instantly make cell biology come alive.
Shown here is a zebrafish embryo.
The iPad screen allows three children to use each device, taking turns making samples and imaging. The CellScopes will come with a new curriculum on plant stomata developed by the California Academy of Sciences, which beta-tested the scopes in May. The ASCB is working with local science educators to identify a motivated teacher (likely 4th—6th grade) who will learn to demonstrate the scopes and loan them to others. The teacher and students will be invited to the ASCB Annual Meeting on Saturday, December 14, to receive the scopes and training on the spot.

As an ASCB member, here's your chance to give back to the schoolchildren of the city that is hosting the 2013 ASCB Annual Meeting. Once upon a time, someone sat you at a microscope and adjusted the eyepiece. Suddenly you were looking into the microworld. Decades later, you still are. It's time to pay it forward. (It's also tax deductible for U.S. residents.)

Published in ASCB Post

Ever since Jessica Polka, co-chair of ASCB's committee for postdocs and students (COMPASS), published an extremely popular post on how to print your favorite protein in 3D, the media seems to have exploded with articles about 3D printing. Coincidence? You decide. Send us your comments in two dimensions.

Published in ASCB Post

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