2013 ASCB Annual Meeting News & Info

  • Jan 09, 2014

    Science Highlights from ASCB 2013: Membranes, Nano-magnets, and the Errant Protein Behind a Cerebellar Disorder

    Modeling membranes, nano-magnets to control cell activity, and a gain-of-function protein behind a severe progressive brainstem disorder were hot topics at the 2013 ASCB Annual Meeting in New Orleans, December 14-18. This year, ASCB continued the tradition of weaving two scientific threads—biophysics and medicine—through many of the 254 science…
    Christina Szalinski
  • Jan 06, 2014

    No Hocus Pocus, Nano-Magnets Control Cell Movement

    Mathieu Coppey imagines using tiny magnets to move cells within living organisms. Coppey, a researcher at the Institut Curie in Paris, isn't envisioning a modern day version of "magnet therapy" touted a century ago by quack medical practitioners. Instead Coppey is using nanoparticle-size magnets to manipulate processes in cells.
    Christina Szalinski
  • Jan 02, 2014

    Professional Media Training at ASCB 2013 Spiced Up My Presentation

    Aside from Google Hangouts and Skype, it was the first time I'd been on video since my friend caught me singing to Spice Girls several years ago. I'd picked a high pressure venue for my return to video—the ASCB Annual Meeting in New Orleans. I was scheduled to give a short talk on Monday about scientists and social media. On Sunday though, I found…
    Christina Szalinski
  • Dec 20, 2013

    The “Cellular Oscars,” Celldance 2013 Video Awards Roll Out a Tiny Red Carpet

    Time-lapse movies of a cellular "heaven and hell," a dividing crane fly sperm cell undergoing, and the early development of muscle cells were recognized with the top three awards in the American Society for Cell Biology's Celldance "Really Useful" Cell Biology Video Contest for 2013. The special Public Outreach Award went to a group of cell…
    Cathy Yarbrough
  • Dec 19, 2013

    ASCB 2013 Twitter Highlights

    Here's what happened at the 2013 ASCB Annual Meeting as told by Twitter users:
    Christina Szalinski
  • Dec 18, 2013

    Twitter Reactions to ASCB 2013

    Here's what people said on Twitter about the 2013 ASCB meeting in New Orleans:
    Christina Szalinski
  • Dec 17, 2013

    Suppressing the Microtubule-Cutting Enzyme, Fidgetin, Allows Injured Adult Nerves to Regrow

    We talk about "hard wiring" the brain but our central nervous system is a work in progress. From the first neuron through childhood and adolescence, the neuronal network grows in complexity and size but also prunes out unneeded connections using molecules like the recently characterized enzyme, fidgetin, which makes strategic cuts in the…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 17, 2013

    Following the Link from Gaucher Disease to Parkinson’s Disease

    It seems an unlikely connection, and yet there is a significant link between Gaucher disease (GD), a purely genetic disease affecting lipid storage, and Parkinson's disease, a largely untreatable progressive degenerative movement disorder of the central nervous system that is often without a clear genetic cause. Those born with two recessive GD…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 17, 2013

    Controlling Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species Weakens Bacterial Biofilms and Breaks Cycle of Unhealing Wounds

    It may begin as a "simple" foot blister, but for patients with type 2 diabetes there is nothing simple about wounds that won't heal. That blister can evolve into a seriously infected wound that refuses to heal and, if gangrene develops, the patient's foot may have to be amputated. Such "simple" foot blisters and other diabetic ulcers or sores…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 16, 2013

    A Gene Called Sunday Driver Steers Researchers to Answers for Congenital Muscle Disease

    A whimsically named fly gene, Sunday Driver, a.k.a. syd, and its mammalian analog, JIP3, seem to be in the driver's seat when it comes to parking the multiple nuclei of a skeletal muscle cell in their correct places, say researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI). Getting that wrong and having mispositioned nuclei is a classic diagnostic…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 15, 2013

    Turning Down Glucose Metabolism in Cells Slows Influenza Infection, Suggesting a New Strategy for Flu Therapy

    Fever, ache, and the other miseries of influenza viral infection afflict 5−20 percent of the U.S. population each year. The "flu" is usually not life-threatening to the majority of its victims, but as the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 showed, flu viruses can evolve into lethal agents and spread worldwide. The ability of flu viruses to change…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 15, 2013

    Uncovering the Molecular Missteps that Lead to Alzheimer’s Disease

    Dramatic stories in cell biology often have sequels—"Duel of the Alzheimer's Proteins, Part XV"—and indeed this work is a nail-biting sequel to George Bloom's hypothesis that interaction between amyloid-beta peptides and the protein tau drives adult neurons into the forbidden pathway of "cell cycle re-entry" (CCR). The long-term result is…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 15, 2013

    High-resolution 3-D Imaging Draws Sharper Picture of Golgi’s Whereabouts When Cells Pack Up for Mitosis

    Cell division is the great domestic drama of a cell's life. In sickness and in health, cell division by mitosis is the complicated yet critical process by which a mother cell divides into two daughter cells. But first the mother cell has to pack up her cellular household contents, disassembling and dividing up everything for her soon-to-be-formed…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 15, 2013

    Nicotine Drives Cell Invasion in Vascular Muscle Cells, Which Contributes to Atherosclerosis

    E-cigarettes have put nicotine back in the news and into the hands of a growing number of American smokers who now "vape," that is, inhale a steam of nicotine, polyethylene glucose (PEG), and flavoring generated by cigarette-shaped, battery-powered vaporizers.
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 15, 2013

    Spontaneous Fusion with macrophages gives new powers to cancer cells

    As we have learned more about the biology of cancer, it has become obvious that, aside from changes to the cancer genome, there are many other factors that determine tumor outcomes. Epigenetics, influences from the microenvironment, exosomes, and interplay with the immune system are now all recognized major players in cancer progression. Fresh…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 15, 2013

    Altering the Tumor Microenvironment Yields Startling Results by Blocking Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Glioblastoma

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and the most deadly adult primary brain tumor, with an average survival of just 14 months following diagnosis. Even with aggressive treatment by surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, most therapeutic approaches targeting the glioma cells in GBM fail. Faced with this bleak picture, Johanna Joyce and…
    ASCB Post Staff
  • Dec 14, 2013

    DORA in NOLA as the JIF Rebellion Reaches 10,000 Signatures and Panel Celebrates First Anniversary

    Insurrection, intellectual rebellion, or learned remonstrance, call it what you will, the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment, or DORA, began one year ago this week in a windowless meeting room in the depths of the Moscone Convention Center when a group of scientists, journal editors, and publishers decided they had a common problem…
    John Fleischman
  • Dec 10, 2013

    Elaine Fuchs Tackles What’s Next for Stem Cell Biology in New Orleans Keynote

    Elaine Fuchs grew up surrounded by scientists. Her father and aunt were scientists at Argonne National Laboratories, and later her older sister became a neuroscientist. So Fuchs has followed in the family footsteps. Today she is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, a professor at the Rockefeller University, and a widely recognized…
    Christina Szalinski
  • Dec 06, 2013

    Insiders and Outsiders: NIH Goes Face-to-Face with Cell Biologists

    One is an insider who just came in from the outside, the other, an outsider serving as an advisor at the very highest level. But both are key players in the future of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Both will be on stage at the ASCB Annual Meeting in New Orleans on Monday, December 16, at 1:30 pm in Room 356.
    John Fleischman
  • Dec 03, 2013

    The Speed of Synthetic Biology: Craig Venter’s Incredible Voyage To Digitize the Life Force

    An experiment: Some warm and starry night, take two senior cell biologists out on a boat. Put wine or beer or something that signals "closed for the day" into one hand and a copy of Craig Venter's latest book, Life At the Speed of Light into the other. (You might have to hold the flashlight.) Ask aloud, "So what do you think of Craig Venter?" Be…
    John Fleischman

Twitter Feed

2013 ASCB Annual Meeting Videos

Mary K. Baylies, Ph.D. and Victoria Schulman - Sunday Driver

Presented at the 2013 ASCB annual meeting. http://www.ascb.org/ascbpost/index.php/component/k2/item/207-a-gene-called-sunday-driver-steers-researchers-to-answers-for-congenital-muscle-disease


 Mary K. Baylies, Ph.D. and Victoria Schulman - Sunday Driver
 High-resolution 3-D Imaging of Golgi - Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz
 A Delicate Balance Disturbed
A Delicate Balance Disturbed
569 sec.
Views: 54
 Stop Boring Us - Delivering More Engaging Science Presentations

 Interview with John Lorsch, Head of the National Institute for General Medical Sciences
 Interview with Dr. Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz - Incoming ASCB President 2014
 Interview with Dr. Jose Victor Garcia-Martinez - E.E. Just Lecture Award Winner
 Interview with Dr. Elaine Fuchs - 2013 ASCB Annual Meeting

ascbtv-side