home page

ASCB Newsletter - October 1997

Awarded for the Winning Paper
    10/01/1997

Molecular Biology of the Cell
Sixth Paper of the Year Award

Awarded for the Winning Paper

Myosin II transport, organization, and phosphorylation: evidence for cortical flow/solation-contraction coupling during cytokinesis and cell locomotion

By: Robbin L. DeBiasio, Gregory M. LaRocca, Penny L. Post, and D. Lansing Taylor of The Division of Molecular Sciences, Center for Light Microscope Imaging and Biotechnology, and Department of Biology Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh

Published in the August 1996 issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell

 


1997 Predoctoral Travel Awards
    10/01/1997

The following students were selected from a large candidate pool by the ASCB Education Committee to receive travel awards to attend the Annual Meeting. Membership gifts help support these awards. Special congratulations to the top ranked awardees, whose awards are sponsored by the Worthington Biochemical Corporation and Bio Rad International. Additional funding is provided by Pfizer, Inc.

1997 ASCB/Worthington Predoctoral Travel Awardees
Magdalena Bezanilla, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Robert Hernandez, East Carolina University School of Medicine
Sunjong Kwon, University of Connecticut Health Center
Catherine Mason, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto
Marsha Miller, University of Pennsylvania
Amy Reilein, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

1997 ASCB/Bio Rad Predoctoral Travel Awardees
Lawrence Goldfinger, Northwestern University Medical School
Sonali Patil, University of Houston
Richard Tuxworth, University College, London
Jennifer Waters, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1997 ASCB Predoctoral Travel Awards
Cynthia Adams, Stanford University
Naila O. Alieva, Moscow State University
Kasper Almholt, BioImage, Novo Nordisk A/S, Denmark
Alexander Avsyuk, Moscow State University
Mitchell Balish, Boston Biomedical Research Institute
Frederic Bard, Yale University
James Bear, Emory University
James Beck, University of Washington
Alexandra Bizeray Benedito, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Kun Bi, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Maureen Blomberg-Wirschell, University of Massachusetts Medical Center
Christa Brown, Vanderbilt University
Michael D. Brown, Colorado State University
Mirella Bucci, Washington University School of Medicine
Maria Calvo, University of Barcelona, Faculty of Medicine, Spain
Christopher Chambers, Loyola University Medical Center
Samit Chatterjee, National Center for Biological Sciences, India
Qingdan Chen, Louisiana State University Medical Center
Rachel Cox, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Denise Crooks, Case Western Reserve University
Jianwu Dai, Duke University Medical Center
Danette Daniels, Yale University
Doris David, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
Erik Dent, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Jonathan Fitz Gerald, University of Chicago
Debora Frank, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Souvav Ghosh, University of Tennessee
Ying Gu, State University of New York at Stonybrook
David Hackam, University of Toronto
Timothy Hawkins, University College, London
Marcia Hershberger, Thomas Jefferson University
Elizabeth Holleran, University of Pennsylvania
Kimberly Huebsch, State University of New York Health Science Center
Sanna Jannsson, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland
Stephen Jesch, Carnegie Mellon University
Arzu Karabay, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Dieter Robert Charles Klopfenstein, University of Basel, Switzerland
Sven Kuhlendahl, University of Alabama, Birmingham
Jeffrey Kwong, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Mark Huen Choong Lam, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Australia
Helene Levrey, University of Minnesota
Yu-Tsueng Liu, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Huda Makhluf, Medical University of South Carolina
Julian Martinez, Yale University School of Medicine
Kelly McDonald, University of Florida
Matthew McLean, State University of New York Health Science Center
Timothy Meerloo, University of Queensland, Australia
Catrina Milgate, Liverpool John Moores University, England
Daniel Miller, Ohio State University
Michael Misamore, Louisiana State University
Ketu Mishra, Tufts University
Laura Mitic, Yale University
Erin Mooney, MD Anderson Cancer Center
Andrea Novais Moreno, Federal University of Parana, Brazil
Sarah Olken, Boston University School of Medicine
Brian Pak, Queen’s University, Kingston
Harris Perlman, Tufts University
Antoine Ramjaun, McGill University
Stevens Kastrup Rehen, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Ingrid Reynaert, University of Leuven, Belgium
Meejeon Roh, University of Alabama
Jaime Melendez Rojel, Universidad de Chile
Susan Schwitzer, University of Colorado Health Science Center
Uzma Shah, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine
Belina Spinner, State University of New York Health Science Center
Gina Story, Northeastern Ohio University College of Medicine
Tao Su, Heart Research Institute, Australia
Shawn Sweeney, Thomas Jefferson University
Srinivas Venkatram, University of Kentucky
Joëlle Vinh, CNRS URA 2054, France
Gina Visser, Northwestern University Medical School
Jiaming Wang, University of Colorado
Anne Warner, Dartmouth College
John Wijsman, University of Western Ontario
Scott Williams, Saint Louis University
Hetty Wong, McGill University
Jason Yabe, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Daniela Zarnescu, Pennsylvania State University
Zhixin Zhang, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Cuiling Zhong, University of North Carolina
Lan Zhou, State University of New York at Buffalo

 


Careers
    10/01/1997

Networking
Editor’s Note: The ASCB Education, Minorities, and Women in Cell Biology committies are working together to provide a series, to be published periodically in the ASCBNewsletter, on issues of work, job searching, and careers. This article is the first in the series.

Only about 50% of available jobs are listed in job fairs and advertisements, and they may not be the jobs you are interested in. Only networking and informational interviews will uncover the other half.

The first person with whom you should discuss your job search is your advisor, but that is only the beginning of networking. Consider contacting acquaintances (class, organizations, work); friends (school, elsewhere); professionals (doctors, dentists); supervisors (current and past jobs); faculty (connect to their acquaintances, including former students now in another laboratory); and relatives (close and distant...and the people they know).

Once that first postdoctoral position is obtained, networking becomes the primary means of finding the next position. Networking opportunities at the ASCB Annual Meeting will be continuous. For example, visiting posters is an opportunity to network as well as a place to gain scientific information. Study the abstracts to determine who is working in your field and what specifically they are doing. Get to know these people at the poster sessions and through e-mail contacts. Let them know what you are doing presently, what you hope to do in the future, and determine if they are willing to help you reach your goals.

Or, if your interest is primarily in teaching, attend the Educational Initiatives Forum during the morning coffee breaks and introduce yourself to the speakers and organizers. Schedule a meeting with them at the Education/Minorities Affairs Committees Information Lounge to discuss a teaching career.

Other Meeting opportunities to support your career advancement are:

  • Career Options and Issues Facing Biologists, an ASCB Education Committee and Women in Cell Biology sponsored lunch held on Monday, December 15, from 12:00 noon-2:00 pm. The cost of $12 for students, $17 for everyone else, includes lunch. Pre-registration is required.
  • What They Never Taught You in Graduate School: Effective Leadership in the Laboratory, an ASCB Program Committee-sponsored workshop held on Saturday, December 13, from 1 pm-5 pm. The cost is $10 and pre-registration is required. If you have not preregistered, plan to attend this workshop next year.
  • Effective Communication: The Science of Scientific Writing, an ASCB Education Committee-sponsored workshop held on Saturday, December 13, 1-5 pm. The cost $10, and pre-registration is required.
  • Peer Review Changes at the NIH, Tuesday, December 16, 12:00 p.m. - 12:30 p.m. Ellie Ehrenfeld, the Director of the Division of Research Grants at the NIH. Meeting registrants are welcome; there is no advance registration.
  • Demonstration Study Section, Tuesday, December 16, 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. The Study Section will be moderated by Gerald Greenhouse and topics will include: small vs. large budgets, how and what to budget, which study section to request, how to read summary statements, what to revise in a resubmission, what grant mechanisms are available, who at NIH to talk with and when, where you have choices, and how you can direct the process of your application. Meeting registrants are welcome; no advance registration is required.
  • Grant support from NSF for improving Education in Cell Biology, Wednesday, December 17, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Herb Levitan, Section Head of the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation, will explore the granting process. Meeting registrants are welcome; there is no advance registration.
  • Minorities Affairs Committee-sponsored activities: The Special Saturday Session, the Minorities Poster Session, and the E. E. Just Lecture. These activities will be held on Saturday, December 14 from 9:30 am-5:00 pm, Sunday, December 14, 11:30 am-2:00 pm and Sunday from 2:00 pm-3:00 pm, respectively. Contact Dottie Doyle at the ASCB National Office Phone: (301) 530-7153; Fax: (301) 530-7139; to participate.
  • ASCB Placement Service. The Placement Service is an important part of a complete job search. Even if a particular position is filled, this becomes an excellent opportunity for an informational interview. An informational interview consists of meeting in person, by phone, or by e-mail to gather information about the institution (academia, educational, industry, government) and your specific research interest, rather than to obtain a job. Some questions to ask: How does one find a job in this field?...Where are the positions typically listed?...Who actually does the hiring?...What other organizations with research in the area of-my interest are hiring now or plan to hire in the near future?...Do you know anyone I might contact?

Remember too, that social events can become networking events, as long as you don’t become overbearing.

To order ASCB Placement Service forms for those with positions to post (employers) and for those seeking positions (candidates), contact the ASCB at Phone: (301) 530-7153, Fax: (301) 530-7139.

-The above was adapted from an article originally published in the ASCB Newsletter, August, 1996.

 


ASCB-EMBO Centrosome Meeting Generates Excitement
    10/01/1997

The American Society for Cell Biology and the European Molecular Biology Organization acknowledge with gratitude the contributions to the Centrosomes and Spindle Pole Bodies Meeting of the H. Dudley Wright Foundation, Pierce Chemical Company, and Zeiss Optical Systems, Inc.

Over 125 scientists from Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Russia, Scotland, and Switzerland, and representing academia, government and industry, participated in the meeting co-organized by the ASCB and the European Molecular Biology Organization on Centrosomes and Spindle Pole Bodies, held at the University of California, Santa Cruz, from August 23-27. Many of those present were pioneers of the field.

This was the first international meeting of scientific experts in this important field of research, which spans a history of more than one hundred years. Meeting participants were welcomed to UCSC by Executive Assistant Chancellor R. Michael Tanner and by meeting organizers John V. Kilmartin of the Medical Research Council in Cambridge, England and Robert E. Palazzo of the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

Organizers John Kilmartin and Robert Palazzo

Participants were exposed to an explosion of information, most of it yet to be published. The meeting began with sessions on Centrosome and Spindle Pole Body Composition and Duplication, chaired by Keith Gull of the University of Manchester, followed by sessions on Microtubule Nucleation and Release, chaired by Trisha Davis of the University of Washington, Centrosome and Basal Body Associated Proteins, chaired by Trina Schroer of the Johns Hopkins University, and Centrosome and Spindle Pole Body Regulation, chaired by Susan Dutcher of the University of Colorado. Combined genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches led to the feeling that the compositional analysis of Centrosomes and SPBs, and the sequence of events during Centrosome and SPB assembly, is definitely approachable given the modern techniques available.

During the course of the meeting, debate centered around detailed understanding of the compositional analysis of Centrosomes and SPBs, as well as the molecular basis of how microtubule nucleation and centrosome-dependent microtubule interactions can be achieved.

Opening Reception
Sessions on Centrosomes in Development, chaired by David Glover of the University of Dundee, and Future Directions chaired by the organizers, concluded the meeting.

The complex role of the centrosome in development, its importance in human fertility, and the awesome analytical tools that are now becoming available to researchers, left participants both humbled and excited about the vista of research that lay before them in future years. In addition, a session of platform presentations, chaired by Laura Marschall of Stanford University, chosen from the many exceptional posters which accompanied the sessions, made it clear that this field enjoys a bounty of mature and talented young researchers who are capable and determined to meet the challenges of future research.

Gerald Schatten of the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center gave a moving tribute of thanks and appreciation to the late Daniel Mazia, who was a pioneer of centrosome research.

Bruce Alberts challenged the participants to be aware of their role not only as researchers, but as scientific citizens of their communities and society as a whole. Alberts described his vision for the National Academy of Sciences in not only promoting scientific research, but also in acting as a catalyst to forge the collective mission of scientists, Congress, and the public at large. Alberts, however, could not leave his own science behind, and described similarities between current Centrosome and SPB research and the early days of research on DNA replication. He urged participants to share their reagents and ideas freely, without need for acknowledgment and to continue the current momentum in Centrosome and SPB research. Alberts also charged participants to work together and apply their collective expertise for the development of new anti-cancer agents, therapies and strategies.

One participant relayed the general tone of the meeting as "electrifying and far exceeding expectations." Palazzo stated that the open communication and generous exchange of information characterized at the meeting was ideal. One inspired postdoc, Frank Luca of the University of Colorado, shared the excitement with the rest of the participants by declaring, "this is the best meeting I have ever attended. The first talk was great, the last talk was great, and all the talks between were great."

El Niño even brought sunny skies and warm weather. Participants from outside the area wondered how any work could be accomplished in such a beautiful setting, and the comment, "another terrible day in Santa Cruz" was frequently heard. Late night discussions at the College Eight Coffee Shop, sunbathing at the beach, walks in the redwoods, a yacht trip on Monterey Bay, and winery tours made the meeting fun as well as scientifically stimulating.

-Robert E. Palazzo, Associate professor, Department of Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence,
-John V. Kilmartin, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, England

 


Classifieds
    10/01/1997

Positions Available
Postdoctoral positions are available to study the mechanism of insulin action on the Na,K-ATPase and the structure, function and physiological significance of ecto-apyrase (CD39, ecto-ATPase). Candidates should have experience in protein biochemistry and molecular biology. Send curriculum vitae and names of two references to: Guido Guidotti, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, 7 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge MA 02138. Fax:( 617) 495-8308; Email EOE/AA.

Postdoctoral position available to study germ cell development in C. elegans. Research areas include: 1) Control of germ cell proliferation and entry into the meiotic pathway; 2) Control and coordination of meiotic prophase progression and gametogenesis; 3) Control of oocyte meiotic maturation. Our experimental approach is genetic, cell biological and molecular. Also see our Website. Contact Tim Schedl, Dept. of Genetics, Campus Box 8232, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis MO 63110. Phone: (314) 362-6162 EOE/AA.

Postdoctoral fellowship available immediately to study oxidative mechanisms of atherogenesis in genetically altered and oxidant-exposed murine models. Candidates with a strong background in molecular biology and/or immunohistochemical techniques are preferred. Must be permanent resident. Interested applicants should send curriculum vitae and names of three references to Dr. Diane L. Tribble, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Donner Laboratory, Room 465, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720. Fax: (510) 486-5342. Email EOE/AA.

Postdoctoral positions available immediately to study various aspects of the biology of normal and transformed epithelial cells. Openings for motivated and creative postdoctoral associates will be in the following four laboratories who are participating in an NIH-funded, multidisciplinary Program Project: Jonathan Jones: The role of hemidesmosomes in epithelial cell adhesion and cell signaling. Kathleen Green: The dynamics of cadherin-catenin complexes during desmosome and adherens junction assembly in epithelial cells. Sharon Stack: Extracellular matrix and adhesion of epithelial cells. Robert Goldman: Intermediate filaments and their associated proteins in epithelial cells. A strong background in cell biology, molecular biology or biochemistry required. Send cv, statement of experience and names of three references to: Dr. Jonathan Jones, CM Biology, Northwestern University Medical School, 303 E. Chicago Avenue, Chicago IL 60611. EOE/AA.

Postdoctoral Position available to study the regulation of microtubule dynamic turnover. Project will utilize functional, in vitro microtubule assembly/nucleation assays, and microinjection of tagged tubulin and in vivo imaging, to characterize regulators of microtubule behavior. Strong background in molecular and/or biochemical methods desired. Send or email CV including research summary and names of three references to: Dr. P. Wadsworth, Department of Biology, C.B. 35810, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst MA 01003. Fax: (413) 545-3243. Email EOE/AA.

Postdoctoral position available immediately for PhD with experience in biochemistry, cell or molecular biology to study the role of mammalian class I myosins. Please send or email CV and names of three references to: Dr. Lynne Coluccio, Boston Biomedical Research Institute, 20 Staniford St., Boston MA 02114. Fax:( 617) 523-6649; Email EOE/AA.

Do You Need a Postdoc, a Research Associate or Senior Colleague?

Look to the ASCB first to fill a vacancy by placing your recruitment advertisement in the monthly ASCB Newsletter

  • Low Rates: $7.50/line, 10-line minimum
  • High Readership: 10,000 research scientists
  • Precise Target: Experienced and qualified membership
  • Convenient Deadline: First of month preceding month of issue

Contact: Rick Sommer
Phone (301) 530-7153
Fax (301) 530-7139

Postdoctoral position to study receptor-mediated endocytosis in living and nonliving hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. NIH-supported Program Project (PI: Dr. Allan Wolkoff) directed at understanding molecular mechanisms and cytoskeletal functions of endocytosis cellular pathways. Experience in immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy and computer-based image analysis is essential. Background in cell biology is desirable. An analytical imaging center with advanced instrumentation is available online as well as facilities in the Depts of Pathology, Anatomy & Structural Biology and Liver Research Center for these investigations. Send cv, brief research summary and references to Dr. Phyllis M. Novikoff, Dept. of Pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx NY 10461; Fax: (718) 430-2488 EOE/AA.

Research Associate positions available in a HHMI laboratory to study exciting and challenging problems in cell signaling. Join us in the Center for Cell Signaling; as we build a center for excellence in the areas of kinase cascades, small GTP binding proteins, protein phosphatases, and nuclear transport. Motivated individuals with record of accomplishment should apply (cv plus three references) to Dr. T.W. Sturgill, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Virginia, Markey Center for Cell Signaling, Box 577, Charlottesville VA 22908 USA via Fax: (804) 924-9659. EOE/AA.

Equipment Available
MILITARY RESEARCH LAB IS CLOSING—Military contractor is selling at drastically reduced prices its PERKIN ELMER PDS MICRODENSITOMETER, Joyce Loebl microdensitometer, Sorvall ultramicrotomes, Reichert Polycut S motorized sliding microtome, refrigerated and rotary microtomes, LKB knife cutter, AO knife sharpener, Gatan dual ion mill and stereo microscopes. For spec sheets, call (202) 544-0836.

 


All Creatures Great and Small
    10/01/1997

The Universality of Genes was the topic at a recent briefing of the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus last month

All Creatures Great and Small: The Universality of genes was the topic at a recent briefing of the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus last month. Philip Hieter of the University of British Columbia and H. Robert Harvitz of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were featured speakers. They addressed another overflow crowd.

The Congressional Caucus briefings were inspired by the Joint Steering Committee for Public Policy; former ASCB President Mike Bishop serves as Scientific Advisor to the Caucus.

Following the noon briefing, the Joint Steering Committee arranged for private visits with the speakers and Reps. James McGovern (D-MA), Edward Markey (D-MA), Joseph Moakley (D-MA) and John Baldacci (D-ME) to urge passage of the Appropriations bill which called for an increased funding for the NIH. The bill passed the next week.

 


ASCB Member Funding Data
    10/01/1997

The information below represents voluntary responses to information requested on the 1997 ASCBmember dues renewal notice. Approximately 55% of members surveyed responded. About 10%of members were students at the time this information was gathered. Members joining the Society for the first time in 1997 were not polled in this survey.

Funding Sources for Federally-Funded ASCBMembers(1997)
Federal Agency # %
NIH 2507 90.97%
NSF 304 9.93%
USDA 66 2.39%
DoE 61 2.21%
Veterans Affairs 42 1.52%
DoD 41 1.49%
NASA 28 1.02%
EPA 7 0.25%
FDA 3 0.11%
DoEd 1 0.04%
Total 3060

 


Gerhart to Receive E.B. Wilson Medal
    10/01/1997

John C. Gerhart of the University of California, Berkeley will receive the 17th Annual E.B. Wilson Award at the ASCB Annual Meeting in December. He will be honored and give the E.B. Wilson address on Sunday evening, December 14.

Gerhart is recognized for his original and scholarly contributions to biochemistry, cell biology and developmental biology. His early work provided the most compelling example of allosteric protein regulation and contributed greatly to modern understanding of feedback control in enzymology. Later he pioneered studies of maturation promoting factor and helped show its central role in regulating the mitotic cycle.

Over the past twenty years, Gerhart inaugurated studies of early patterning in Xenopus embryos, explaining in modern cellular terms classical experiments on twinning and axiation. His work on gastrulation and establishment of the body plan in vertebrates has served as a coherent basis for much of the molecular studies on signaling and cell specification at these early stages.

Gerhart is also known for his deep and scholarly reviews and monographs that have influenced students of cell biology, embryology and evolution.

 


Grants & Opportunities
    10/01/1997

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral Fellowships In Biological Sciences
1998 Competition: The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in an international competition administered by the National Research Council, awards predoctoral fellowships for study and research leading to the Ph.D. or Sc.D. in the biological sciences. The awards focus on research directed to understanding basic biological processes and disease mechanisms. eighty predoctoral fellowships for up to five years of support. Fellowship awards provide an annual stipend of $15,000 and $15,000 annual cost-of-education allowance, Application Deadline: November 12, 1997. Contact the Hughes Fellowship Program. Phone: (202) 334-2872, Fax: (202) 334-3419

National Science Foundation - Alan T. Waterman Award
Nominations for the 23rd Waterman Award are being accepted until October 31, 1997. the 1998 Award consists of a citation, a bronze medal, and a grant of $500,000 over a three-year period for scientific research or advanced study in the biological, mathematical, medical, engineering, physical, social or other sciences at the institution of recipients choice.

Candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents and must be 35 years of age or younger or not more than 5 years beyond receipt of the Ph.D. degree by December 31 of the year in which they are nominated. For more contact Susan E. Fannoney, (703) 306-1096.

Wellcome Visiting Scientists Professorship In The Basic Medical Sciences 1998-99
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology invites nominations from U.S. medical schools, universities and other nonprofit scientific research institutions for Wellcome Visiting Professorships in the Basic Medical Sciences, sponsored by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. For Application Procedures contact Rose P. Grimm, Executive Office, FASEB, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3998. Phone: (301) 530-7090, Fax:(301) 530-7049. Deadline for institutions to apply is March 2, 1998.

 


WICB Announces Junior and Senior Awards
    10/01/1997

Women in Cell Biology Committee Chair Sue Shafer announced the selection of the 1997 WICB awards, to Elaine Fuchs of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of Chicago and Lorraine Pillus of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Senior Award, to be presented to Fuchs, recognizes a man or woman for scientific achievement in cell biology and a strong commitment to fostering the careers of women in science. Pillus will receive the Junior Award, for a woman at the beginning stages of her career who has demonstrated potential for outstanding scientific contributions.

The Awards will be presented at the Career Discussion Lunch sponsored by the ASCB Education and Women in Cell Biology committees at the 37th ASCBAnnual Meeting.

 


Symposium & Minisymposium Speakers and Schedule
    10/01/1997

Washington, D.C., December 13-17, 1997

Symposium &Minisymposium
Speakers and Schedule

The first symposium is from 8:00–9:00 AM each day; the second is from 10:30 AM–12:00 Noon each day; Minisymposia, six concurrent each day starting on Sunday, run from 3:30–5:45 PM. All sessions will be held in the Washington Convention Center. See the Annual Meeting Program or the ASCB Website for information about additional programs and activities.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13

KEYNOTE SYMPOSIUM
Biomedical Research in the 21st Century (Hall C)
L. Hartwell, Hutchinson Cancer Res Ctr, Chair
E. Lander, Whitehead Inst, Massachusetts Inst of Tech
S. Tilghman, Princeton Univ

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14

SYMPOSIA
Building the Brain
(Hall C)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the National Eye Institute
C. J. Shatz (Chair), Univ of California, Berkeley
Neural Activity and the Sculpting of Connectivity in the Mammalian Visual System.
T. Jessell, Columbia Univ Col of Physicians & Surgeons
Inductive Signals and the Generation of Neuronal Patterns in the Vertebrate CNS.
M. Tessier-Lavigne, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Univ of California, San Francisco
Molecular Mechanisms of Axon Guidance.

Protein Misfolding & Degradation: Cellular Control and Viral Escapes (Hall C)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Leica Corporation
H. Ploegh (Chair), Massachusetts Inst of Technology
The Stealth Strategies of Human Cytomegalovirus.
A. Ciechanover, Technion Israel Inst of Tech
The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Substrates.
P. Walter, Univ of California, San Francisco
Intracellular Signaling from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to the Nucleus.

MINISYMPOSIA
CDKs and CKIs in Cellular Growth, Mitosis and Disease. (Room 40)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Journal of Cell Biology / the Rockefeller University Press.
S. Reed, C. Sherr, Cochairs
R.J. Sheaff, M. Groudine, M. Gordon, J.M. Roberts, and B.E. Clurman.
D.W. Goodrich, L. Connell-Crowley, X. Leng, and J. W. Harper.
S.I. Reed, E. Bailly, B. Bertolaet, D. Clarke, P. Kaiser, V. Moncollin, M. Smeets, C. Spruck, M. Watson, and K.A. Won.
C.J. Sherr, J.A. Diehl, F. Zindy, and M.F. Roussel.
P. Kaldis and M.J. Solomon.
H.S. Bernstein and S.R. Coughlin.

Regulating the Polymers of the Cytoskeleton. (Room 38)
E. Salmon, Y. Zheng, Cochairs
A. Desai, T.J. Mitchison, and C.E. Walczak.
Y. Zheng, O. Martin, A. Iwamatsu, and C. Wiese.
V. Prahlad, M. Yoon, L. Marekov, P. Steinert, and R.D. Goldman.
B.E. Drees and M.C. Beckerle.
C.M. Waterman-Storer and E.D. Salmon.
K.H. Downing and E. Nogales.

Chromatin: Assembly, Remodeling, Histone Modification. (Room 39)
C.D. Allis, L. Pillus, Cochairs
L. Pillus, A.S. Clarke, L. Freeman-Cook, S.J. Jacobson, J.E. Lowell, J.M. Sherman, and E.M. Stone.
W.F. Marshall, A. Straight, J. Marko, J. Swedlow, A. Dernburg, A. Belmont, A.W. Murray, D.A. Agard, and J.W. Sedat.
W. Gu, P. Szauter, and J.C. Lucchesi.
J.G. Gall and C. Murphy.
A. Losada, M. Hirano, and T. Hirano.
J.E. Brownell, M.H. Kuo, R. Ohba, T. Ranalli, E. Smith, Y. Wei, J. Zhou, and C.D. Allis.

Transport Across the Membrane Bilayer. (Room 31)
A. Johnson, T. Rapoport, Cochairs
C.V. Nicchitta and T. Zheng.
K. Rüomisch.
J.F. Hunt, S. Weinkauf, L. Henry, D.olover, and J. Deisenhofer
R.S. Hegde and V.R. Lingappa.
T.A. Rapoport

Disintegrins. (Room 33)
R. Black, D.J. Pan, Cochairs
B.J. Gilpin, F. Loechel, M.G. Mattei, E. Engvall, R. Albrechtsen, and U.M. Wewer.
P. Primakoff, R. Yuan, C. Cho, and D.G. Myles.
R. Black, C. Rauch, K. Kozlosky, J. Peschon, J. Slack, P. Reddy, R. Paxton, C. March, and D. Cerretti.
D.D. Blumberg, T. Varney, S. Parrish, E. Casademunt, and J. Dolman.
D.J. Pan and G.M. Rubin.
M. Chen, A.P. Huovila, E. Almeida, D. Bigler, C. Gibson, L. Shaw, A. Mercurio, and J. White.

Left-Right Asymmetry: From Molecules to Clinic. (Room 20)
W. Wood, H.J. Yost, Cochairs
J-N. Chen, F.J.M. vanEeden, K.S. Warren, C. Nüsslein-Volhard, P. Haffter, and M. Fishman.
M. Gebbia, M.T. Bassi, G.B. Ferrero, K. Kosaki, and B. Casey.
D. Bergmann and W.B. Wood.
D.M. Supp, S.S. Potter, and M. Brueckner.
P.G. Melloy, J.L. Ewart, M.F. Cohen, M.E. Desmond, M.R. Kuehn, and C.W. Lo.
H.J. Yost, B.A. Hayatt, M.C. Danos, and J.L. Lohr

MONDAY, DECEMBER 15

SYMPOSIA

How The Cell Sorts (Hall C)
Sponsored by Corning Costar Corporation
J. Bonifacino (Chair), NIH, NICHD
Protein Sorting in the Endosomal / Lysosomal System.
J. Lippincott-Schwartz, NIH, NICHD
Membrane Trafficking and Recycling within the Secretory Pathway.
G. Warren, Imperial Cancer Research Fund
Mitotic Division of the Golgi Apparatus.

The Role of ECM and Integrins in Regulating Higher Order Structure and Gene Expression (President’s Symposium) (Hall C).
M. Bissell (Chair), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Form and Function in Normal and Malignant Breast: The Dominance of Tissue Structure.
A. Lander, Univ of California, Irvine
Molecules and Mechanisms in Neuronal Guidance.
K. Yamada, NIH, NIDR
Integrin Signaling and Cytoskeletal Complexes.

MINISYMPOSIA

The Cell Biology of Neurodegenerative Disease. (Room 40)
Supported by an Educational Grant from Merck & Co., Inc.
D. Selkoe, S. Sisodia, Cochairs
W.M. Saxton and D.D. Hurd.
D.J. Selkoe.
A. Shirvan, A. Barzlai, I. Ziv, G. Fleminger, T. Machlin, I. Brudo, and E. Melamed.
S.S. Sisodia, P.C. Wong, G. Thinakaran, J. Davis, D.R. Borchelt, C. Bouton, H. Zheng, H.H. Slunt and D.L. Price.
T.L. Williamson, K.L. Anderson, and D.W. Cleveland.
D.A. Harris, S. Lehmann, and N. Daude.

Cell-Cell Adhesion and Junctions. (Room 38)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Corning Costar Corporation
D. Goodenough, B. Gumbiner, Cochairs
D.A. Goodenough, A.M. Simon, and D.L. Paul.
A.P. Kowalczyk, E.A. Bornslaeger, and K.J. Green.
S. Tuvia, T.D. Garver, and V. Bennett.
B.M. Gumbiner, W. Brieher, A. Yap, and Y. Zhong.
A.S. Fanning and J.M. Anderson.
R.S. Lamb and R.G. Debor.

Structure and Function of Kinetochores. (Room 39)
D. Cleveland, G. Gorbsky, Cochairs
C.E. Walczak, A. Desai, and T.J. Mitchison.
O. Vafa and K.F. Sullivan.
K.W. Wood, R. Sakowicz, L.S.B. Goldstein, and D.W. Cleveland.
M. Kallio, J. Weinstein, D.J. Burke, and G.J. Gorbsky.
D.A. Starr, B.C. Williams, Z. Li, T.S. Hays, and M.L. Goldberg.
A.J. Hunt and J.R. McIntosh.

Maternal Regulation of Embryonic Polarity. (Room 31)
K. Kemphues, G. Schupbach, Cochairs
M. Kloc and L. Etkin.
T. Schupbach, L. Nilson, M. Konsolaki, A.M. Queenan, and A. Ghabrial.
E.A. Drier, L.H. Huang, P.H. Lin, J. Yang, and R. Steward.
K.J. Kemphues.
R.V. Aroian, C.A. Rappleye, and C.W. Smith
H.J. Yost, K.E. Schroeder, L.M. Eisenberg, and M.L. Cindic

Aging and Senescence. (Room 33)
C. Kenyon, E. Wang, Cochairs
M.J. Bertram, N. Berube, Q. Ran, X. Hang-Swanson, K. Spurgers, J.R. Smith, and O.M. Pereira-Smith.
E. Wang and L.B. Ruest.
J. Apfeld, K. Lin, J. Dorman, A. Rodan, and C. Kenyon.
D. Sinclair, K. Mills, and L. Guarente.
T. Yamashita, M. Kuroo, Y. Nabeshima, M. Noda.
D. Albertson, R. Segraves, D. Sudar, C. Chen, S. Clark, M. Duurst, J. Gray, D. Pinkel.

The Molecular Basis of Sensation. (Room 20)
L. Buck, R. Margolskee, Cochairs
V. Muresan, A. Lyass, and B.J. Schnapp.
W.P. Hayes, I. Provencio, C.J. Siegert, G. Jiang, W.J. De Grip, and M.D. Rollag.
H.G. Kuruvilla and T.M. Hennessey.
L.B. Buck.
D.G. Motto, C.M. Adams, M.G. Anderson, M.P. Price, W.A. Johnson, and M.J.Welsh.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 16

SYMPOSIA

Signals that Control Cell Structure: Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton. (Hall C)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Journal of Cell Biology / the Rockefeller University Press.
A. Hall (Chair), MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology
Coordinated Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton and of Gene Transcription by the Rho GTPase Family.
J.A. Cooper, Washington Univ
Control of Actin Assembly by Capping Protein in Vivo and in Vitro.
P. Cossart, Institut Pasteur
Signaling and Actin Cytoskeleton Rearrangements Induced by the Intracellular Pathogen Listeria Monocytogenes.

Nuclear Dynamics and Function. (Hall C)
G. Dreyfuss (Chair), Howard Hughes Med Inst, Univ of Pennsylvania
Nuclear Export and Import of Proteins and RNAs.
B. Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Controlling Genome Duplication throughout the Cell Cycle.
T. Reid, NIH, NCHGR
Molecular Cytogenetic Approaches to Study Chromosomal Aberration during Carcinogenesis

MINISYMPOSIA

Mitotic Checkpoints. (Room 40)
D. Koshland, C. Rieder, Cochairs
S. Venkatram and P.M. Mirabito.
G. K.T. Chan, B. Schaar, and T. Yen.
G.J. Gorbsky, R.H. Chen, and A.W. Murray.
J.C. Waters, R.H. Chen, A.W. Murray, and E.D. Salmon.
R.W. Cole, A. Khodjakov, C. Cogswell, and C.L. Rieder.
O. Cohen-Fix and D. Koshland.

Nuclear Entry and Exit: The Rules and Players. (Room 38)
S. Adam, S. Wente, Cochairs
B. Fahrenkrog, U. Aebi, and N. Panté.
Y. Liu, T.H. Chang, and A. Tartakoff.
S.R. Wente.
S.A. Adam, N.C. Chi, E.J.H. Adam and G.D. Visser.
M.J. Matunis and G. Blobel.

Pathogen Invasion. (Room 39)
N. Andrews, J. Galan, Cochairs
V. Nussenzweig.
M.M. Gedde, D.E. Higgins, L.G. Tilney, and D.A. Portnoy.
J.E. Galáan and L.M. Chen.
D.S. Black and J.B. Bliska.
B. Burleigh, E. Caler, and N.W. Andrews.
R. Isberg.

Cell adhesion and Homing. (Room 31)
T. Springer, D. Wagner, Cochairs
T.R. Kyriakides, Y.H. Zhu, L.T. Smith, S.D. Bain, Z. Yang, M. Lin, M. LaMarca, C.E. McKinney, E.I. Ginns, and P. Bornstein.
S. Liu, M. Pfaff, D.J. Erle, and M.H. Ginsberg.
J.H. Wang.
D.D. Wagner and Z.M. Dong.
M.D. Gunn, K. Tangemann, J.G. Cyster, S.D. Rosen, and L.T. Williams.
T. Springer.

Lipid Regulators of Cell Function. (Room 33)
S. Corvera, S. Emr, Cochairs
V. Patki and S. Corvera.
S.D. Emr and A.E. Wurmser.
P. Melancon, A. Claude, and J.P. Yan.
A. Siddhanta, Y.G. Chen, C.D. Austin, A. Elgort, and D. Shields.
Y. Zhang, T. Jackson, I. Blader, A. Greenwood, and A. Theibert.
I. Gaidarov, J. Krupnick, J.L. Falck, J.L. Benovic, and J.H. Keen.

Organelle Integrity and Inheritance. (Room 20)
L. Weisman, M. Yaffe, Cochairs
J.P. Luzio, N.A. Bright, B.J. Reaves, C.W. Fearon, S.R. Gray, and B.M. Mullock.
K. Okamoto, S.M. Newman, P.S. Perlman, and R.A. Butow.
U. Acharya, A. Mallabiabarrena, J. Acharya, and V. Malhotra.
L.S. Weisman, N.L. Catlett, and Y.X. Wang.
M.P. Yaffe, K. Berger, H. Fisk, and K. Shepard.
D.T. Shima, N. Cabrera, R. Pepperkok, and G. Warren.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17

SYMPOSIA

AIDS: Progress and Promise. A. Fauci (Chair), NIH, NIAID (Hall C)
Post Factors in the pathogenesis of HIV Disease.
D. Littman, Skirball Inst, New York Univ
Chemokine Receptors and Animal Models for HIV Pathogenesis.
R. Weiss, Inst of Cancer Research, Royal Cancer Hospital
How and Why AIDS Patients Get Cancer.

Morphogenesis (Heinz Herrmann Symposium) (Hall C)
A. McMahon(Chair), Harvard Univ
Sexually Dimorphic Development of the Mammalian Reproductive System Is Regulated by Wnt- Signaling.
J. Kimble, Univ of Wisconsin
Regulation of Morphogenesis and organ formation in C. Elegans.
M. Krasnow, Stanford Univ
Patterning of Airway Branching in Drosophila by FGF.

MINISYMPOSIA

Apoptosis and Cellular Control. (Room 40)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Glaxo Wellcome Research and Development.
V. Dixit, D. Newmeyer, Cochairs
B.B. Zhou, H. Li, J. Yuan, and M.W. Kirschner.
M. Deshmukh, Y. Cheng, J. Werth, J. Cocabo, S. Rothman, D.M. Holtzman, and E.M. Johnson, Jr.
D.W. Andrews, W. Zhu, and B. Leber.
V.M. Dixit.
D.D. Newmeyer.
Y.T. Hsu, K.G. Wolter, C.L. Smith, A. Nechushtan, L. Marrone, X.G. Xi, and R.J. Youle.

Membrane Trafficking: New Paradigms and Directions. (Room 38)
W. Balch, K. Howell, Cochairs
T.B. Reynolds, M.R. Lyons, and T.R. Graham.
G. Liu, L. Thomas, R.A. Warren, M. Sanders, C.C. Cunningham C.A. Enns, J.H. Hartwig, and G. Thomas.
L. Bonfanti, O. Martella, A.A. Mironov Jr., A. Fusella, A.A. Mironov, and A. Luini.
R. Le Borgne and B. Hoflack.
W.E. Balch, M. Aridor, T. Rowe, S. Bannykh, B. Allan, J. Weissman, S. Ho, and H. Plutner.
M.S. Ladinsky, J.R. Kremer, D.N. Mastronarde, J.R. McIntosh, L.A. Staehelin, and K.E. Howell.

Mechanisms of Cell Motility and Cytokinesis. (Room 39)
M. Titus, Y.-L. Wang, Cochairs
U. Henningsen, G. Steinberg, and M. Schliwa.
Y.L. Wang and S.P. Wheatley.
F. Chang.
A. Huttenlocher, S. Palecek, D. Lauffenburger, R. Mellgren, M. Ginsberg, and A. Horwitz.
M.A. Titus.
R.L. DeBiasio, G.M. LaRocca, P.L. Post, and D.L. Taylor.

Signal Transduction in Normal and Malignant Cells. (Room 31)
J.M. Bishop, A. Richmond, Cochairs
T. Harding, X. Li, R. Dy, and H.S. Earp.
A. Richmond.
M. Liyanage, C. Barlow, P.B. Moens, D. Wangsa, C.X. Deng, A. Wynshaw-Boris, and T. Ried.
J. Engelman, C. Wykoff, S. Yasuhara, K. Song, T. Okamoto, and M.P. Lisanti.
R. Kolesnick.
J.M. Bishop.

Protein Degradation. (Room 33)
M. Hochstrasser, J. Ruderman, Cochairs
E.A. Fisher, D.M. Mitchell, M. Zhou, H. Wang, J. Aitchison, and H.N. Ginsberg.
G.L. Lukacs, G. Segal, D. Ferguson, J. Chamberlain, N. Kartner, and F. Zhang.
K. Mori, T. Kawahara, H. Yanagi, and T. Yura.
D. Skowyra, K.L. Craig, M. Tyers, S.J. Elledge, and W. Harper.
M. Hochstrasser.
J. Ruderman, F. Townsley, H. Bastians, and D. Faruggio.

RNA: Untranslated Sequences Controlling Localization, Stability and Differentiation. (Room 20)
J. Keene, R. Singer, Cochairs
R. Wharton, A. Dahanukar, T. Lee, and M. Patterson.
R. Sanchez, Z.F. Wang, T.C. Ingledue, and W.F. Marzluff.
R.M. Long, P. Chartrand, W. Gu, X. Meng, M.R. Schaefer, and R.H. Singer.
J.O. Deshler and B.S. Schnapp.
J. Keerle.
Q. Chen and D. Herring, and P.J. Good.

 


Special Interest Subgroups
    10/01/1997

The Following Special Interest Subgroups will be held on Saturday, December 13 from 1:00-5:00 p.m. at the Washington Convention Center. The ASCB Annual Meeting will open with the Keynote Biomedical Research in the 21st Century, with Leland Hartwell, Eric Lander and Shirley Tilghman, following the conclusion of the Subgroups, at 6:00 p.m.

Following the names of the Subgroups, organizers and Convention Center location of the Subgroup are listed.
More detailed descriptions of each Subgroup will be published in the Annual Meeting Program and is on the ASCB Website

Organization of Spindle Poles
Duane A. Compton, Dartmouth Medical School
Room 22

Cellular Biology of Connexin Channels
Andrew L. Harris, Johns Hopkins University and Linda Musil, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University
Room 4

The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Tweezer Technology in Cell Biology
Bhanu P. Jena, Yale University and Heinrich Horber, EMBL
Room 27

Three-Dimensional Tissue Culture: A New Dynamic In Cell Biology
U. M. Jessup, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Insitute
Room 36

Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy in Modern Cell and Molecular Biology
J. Richard McIntosh, University of Colorado
Room 13

Molecular Mechanisms of Vesicle Formation
Mark McNiven, Mayo Clinic
Room 33

Structure and Function of the Actin-Related Proteins
R. Dyche Mullins and Thomas Pollard, Salk Institute for Biological Studies and Elizabeth Holleran and Erika Holzbauer, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine
Room 20

Mechanosensitivity: Cell-Specific Responses
Albert J. Banes, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Jeremy B. Tuttle, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center
Room 37

The Dynein/Dynactin Pathway and Its Multiple Functions
Richard B. Vallee, Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research
Room 32

Washington, D.C., December 13-17, 1997

Symposium & Minisymposium
Speakers and Schedule

The first symposium is from 8:00–9:00 AM each day; the second is from 10:30 AM–12:00 Noon each day; Minisymposia, six concurrent each day starting on Sunday, run from 3:30-5:45 PM. All sessions will be held in the Washington Convention Center. See the Annual Meeting Program or the ASCB Website for information about additional programs and activities.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13

KEYNOTE SYMPOSIUM
Biomedical Research in the 21st Century
(Hall C)
L. Hartwell, Hutchinson Cancer Res Ctr, Chair
E. Lander, Whitehead Inst, Massachusetts Inst of Tech
S. Tilghman, Princeton Univ.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14

SYMPOSIA

Building the Brain(Hall C)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the National Eye Institute
C. J. Shatz (Chair), Univ of California, Berkeley
Neural Activity and the Sculpting of Connectivity in the Mammalian Visual System.
T. Jessell, Columbia Univ Col of Physicians & Surgeons
Inductive Signals and the Generation of Neuronal Patterns in the Vertebrate CNS.
M. Tessier-Lavigne, Howard Hughes Med Inst, Univ of California, San Francisco
Molecular Mechanisms of Axon Guidance.

Protein Misfolding & Degradation: Cellular Control and Viral Escapes (Hall C)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Leica Corporation
H. Ploegh (Chair), Massachusetts Inst of Technology
The Stealth Strategies of Human Cytomegalovirus.
A. Ciechanover, Technion Israel Inst of Tech
The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Substrates.
P. Walter, Univ of California, San Francisco
Intracellular Signaling from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to the Nucleus.

MINISYMPOSIA

CDKs and CKIs in Cellular Growth, Mitosis and Disease. (Room 40)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Journal of Cell Biology / the Rockefeller University Press.
S. Reed, C. Sherr, Cochairs
R.J. Sheaff, M. Groudine, M. Gordon, J.M. Roberts, and B.E. Clurman.
D.W. Goodrich, L. Connell-Crowley, X. Leng, and J. W. Harper.
S.I. Reed, E. Bailly, B. Bertolaet, D. Clarke, P. Kaiser, V. Moncollin, M. Smeets, C. Spruck, M. Watson, and K.A. Won.
C.J. Sherr, J.A. Diehl, F. Zindy, and M.F. Roussel.
P. Kaldis and M.J. Solomon.
H.S. Bernstein and S.R. Coughlin.

Regulating the Polymers of the Cytoskeleton. (Room 38)
E. Salmon, Y. Zheng, Cochairs
A. Desai, T.J. Mitchison, and C.E. Walczak.
Y. Zheng, O. Martin, A. Iwamatsu, and C. Wiese.
V. Prahlad, M. Yoon, L. Marekov, P. Steinert, and R.D. Goldman.
B.E. Drees and M.C. Beckerle.
C.M. Waterman-Storer and E.D. Salmon.
K.H. Downing and E. Nogales.

Chromatin: Assembly, Remodeling, Histone Modification. (Room 39)
C.D. Allis, L. Pillus, Cochairs
L. Pillus, A.S. Clarke, L. Freeman-Cook, S.J. Jacobson, J.E. Lowell, J.M. Sherman, and E.M. Stone.
W.F. Marshall, A. Straight, J. Marko, J. Swedlow, A. Dernburg, A. Belmont, A.W. Murray, D.A. Agard, and J.W. Sedat.
W. Gu, P. Szauter, and J.C. Lucchesi.
J.G. Gall and C. Murphy.
A. Losada, M. Hirano, and T. Hirano.
J.E. Brownell, M.H. Kuo, R. Ohba, T. Ranalli, E. Smith, Y. Wei, J. Zhou, and C.D. Allis.

Transport Across the Membrane Bilayer. (Room 31)
A. Johnson, T. Rapoport, Cochairs
C.V. Nicchitta and T. Zheng.
K. Rüomisch.
J.F. Hunt, S. Weinkauf, L. Henry, D.olover, and J. Deisenhofer
R.S. Hegde and V.R. Lingappa.
T.A. Rapoport

Disintegrins. (Room 33)
R. Black, D.J. Pan, Cochairs
B.J. Gilpin, F. Loechel, M.G. Mattei, E. Engvall, R. Albrechtsen, and U.M. Wewer.
P. Primakoff, R. Yuan, C. Cho, and D.G. Myles.
R. Black, C. Rauch, K. Kozlosky, J. Peschon, J. Slack, P. Reddy, R. Paxton, C. March, and D. Cerretti.
D.D. Blumberg, T. Varney, S. Parrish, E. Casademunt, and J. Dolman.
D.J. Pan and G.M. Rubin.
M. Chen, A.P. Huovila, E. Almeida, D. Bigler, C. Gibson, L. Shaw, A. Mercurio, and J. White.

Left-Right Asymmetry: From Molecules to Clinic. (Room 20)
W. Wood, H.J. Yost, Cochairs
J-N. Chen, F.J.M. vanEeden, K.S. Warren, C. Nüsslein-Volhard, P. Haffter, and M. Fishman.
M. Gebbia, M.T. Bassi, G.B. Ferrero, K. Kosaki, and B. Casey.
D. Bergmann and W.B. Wood.
D.M. Supp, S.S. Potter, and M. Brueckner.
P.G. Melloy, J.L. Ewart, M.F. Cohen, M.E. Desmond, M.R. Kuehn, and C.W. Lo.
H.J. Yost, B.A. Hayatt, M.C. Danos, and J.L. Lohr

MONDAY, DECEMBER 15

SYMPOSIA

How The Cell Sorts (Hall C)
Sponsored by Corning Costar Corporation
J. Bonifacino (Chair), NIH, NICHD
Protein Sorting in the Endosomal / Lysosomal System.
J. Lippincott-Schwartz, NIH, NICHD
Membrane Trafficking and Recycling within the Secretory Pathway.
G. Warren, Imperial Cancer Research Fund
Mitotic Division of the Golgi Apparatus.

The Role of ECM and Integrins in Regulating Higher Order Structure and Gene Expression (President's Symposium) (Hall C).
M. Bissell (Chair), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Form and Function in Normal and Malignant Breast: The Dominance of Tissue Structure.
A. Lander, Univ of California, Irvine
Molecules and Mechanisms in Neuronal Guidance.
K. Yamada, NIH, NIDR
Integrin Signaling and Cytoskeletal Complexes.

MINISYMPOSIA

The Cell Biology of Neurodegenerative Disease. (Room 40)
Supported by an Educational Grant from Merck & Co., Inc.
D. Selkoe, S. Sisodia, Cochairs
W.M. Saxton and D.D. Hurd.
D.J. Selkoe.
A. Shirvan, A. Barzlai, I. Ziv, G. Fleminger, T. Machlin, I. Brudo, and E. Melamed.
S.S. Sisodia, P.C. Wong, G. Thinakaran, J. Davis, D.R. Borchelt, C. Bouton, H. Zheng, H.H. Slunt and D.L. Price.
T.L. Williamson, K.L. Anderson, and D.W. Cleveland.
D.A. Harris, S. Lehmann, and N. Daude.

Cell-Cell Adhesion and Junctions. (Room 38)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Corning Costar Corporation
D. Goodenough, B. Gumbiner, Cochairs
D.A. Goodenough, A.M. Simon, and D.L. Paul.
A.P. Kowalczyk, E.A. Bornslaeger, and K.J. Green.
S. Tuvia, T.D. Garver, and V. Bennett.
B.M. Gumbiner, W. Brieher, A. Yap, and Y. Zhong.
A.S. Fanning and J.M. Anderson.
R.S. Lamb and R.G. Debor,

Structure and Function of Kinetochores. (Room 39)
D. Cleveland, G. Gorbsky, Cochairs
C.E. Walczak, A. Desai, and T.J. Mitchison.
O. Vafa and K.F. Sullivan.
K.W. Wood, R. Sakowicz, L.S.B. Goldstein, and D.W. Cleveland.
M. Kallio, J. Weinstein, D.J. Burke, and G.J. Gorbsky.
D.A. Starr, B.C. Williams, Z. Li, T.S. Hays, and M.L. Goldberg.
A.J. Hunt and J.R. McIntosh.

Maternal Regulation of Embryonic Polarity. (Room 31)
K. Kemphues, G. Schupbach, Cochairs
M. Kloc and L. Etkin.
T. Schupbach, L. Nilson, M. Konsolaki, A.M. Queenan, and A. Ghabrial.
E.A. Drier, L.H. Huang, P.H. Lin, J. Yang, and R. Steward.
K.J. Kemphues.
R.V. Aroian, C.A. Rappleye, and C.W. Smith
H.J. Yost, K.E. Schroeder, L.M. Eisenberg, and M.L. Cindic

Aging and Senescence. (Room 33)
C. Kenyon, E. Wang, Cochairs
M.J. Bertram, N. Berube, Q. Ran, X. Hang-Swanson, K. Spurgers, J.R. Smith, and O.M. Pereira-Smith.
E. Wang and L.B. Ruest.
J. Apfeld, K. Lin, J. Dorman, A. Rodan, and C. Kenyon.
D. Sinclair, K. Mills, and L. Guarente.
T. Yamashita, M. Kuroo, Y. Nabeshima, M. Noda.
D. Albertson, R. Segraves, D. Sudar, C. Chen, S. Clark, M. Duurst, J. Gray, D. Pinkel.

The Molecular Basis of Sensation. (Room 20)
L. Buck, R. Margolskee, Cochairs
V. Muresan, A. Lyass, and B.J. Schnapp.
W.P. Hayes, I. Provencio, C.J. Siegert, G. Jiang, W.J. De Grip, and M.D. Rollag.
H.G. Kuruvilla and T.M. Hennessey.
L.B. Buck.
D.G. Motto, C.M. Adams, M.G. Anderson, M.P. Price, W.A. Johnson, and M.J.Welsh.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 16

SYMPOSIA

Signals that Control Cell Structure: Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton. (Hall C)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Journal of Cell Biology / the Rockefeller University Press.
A. Hall(Chair), MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology
Coordinated Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton and of Gene Transcription by the Rho GTPase Family.
J.A. Cooper, Washington Univ
Control of Actin Assembly by Capping Protein in Vivo and in Vitro.
P. Cossart, Institut Pasteur
Signaling and Actin Cytoskeleton Rearrangements Induced by the Intracellular Pathogen Listeria Monocytogenes.

Nuclear Dynamics and Function. (Hall C)
G. Dreyfuss (Chair), Howard Hughes Med Inst, Univ of Pennsylvania
Nuclear Export and Import of Proteins and RNAs.
B. Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Controlling Genome Duplication throughout the Cell Cycle.
T. Reid, NIH, NCHGR
Molecular Cytogenetic Approaches to Study Chromosomal Aberration during Carcinogenesis

MINISYMPOSIA

Mitotic Checkpoints. (Room 40)
D. Koshland, C. Rieder, Cochairs
S. Venkatram and P.M. Mirabito.
G. K.T. Chan, B. Schaar, and T. Yen.
G.J. Gorbsky, R.H. Chen, and A.W. Murray.
J.C. Waters, R.H. Chen, A.W. Murray, and E.D. Salmon.
R.W. Cole, A. Khodjakov, C. Cogswell, and C.L. Rieder.
O. Cohen-Fix and D. Koshland.

Nuclear Entry and Exit: The Rules and Players. (Room 38)
S. Adam, S. Wente, Cochairs
B. Fahrenkrog, U. Aebi, and N. Panté.
Y. Liu, T.H. Chang, and A. Tartakoff.
S.R. Wente.
S.A. Adam, N.C. Chi, E.J.H. Adam and G.D. Visser.
M.J. Matunis and G. Blobel.

Pathogen Invasion. (Room 39)
N. Andrews, J. Galan, Cochairs
V. Nussenzweig.
M.M. Gedde, D.E. Higgins, L.G. Tilney, and D.A. Portnoy.
J.E. Galáan and L.M. Chen.
D.S. Black and J.B. Bliska.
B. Burleigh, E. Caler, and N.W. Andrews.
R. Isberg.

Cell adhesion and Homing. (Room 31)
T. Springer, D. Wagner, Cochairs
T.R. Kyriakides, Y.H. Zhu, L.T. Smith, S.D. Bain, Z. Yang, M. Lin, M. LaMarca, C.E. McKinney, E.I. Ginns, and P. Bornstein.
S. Liu, M. Pfaff, D.J. Erle, and M.H. Ginsberg.
J.H. Wang.
D.D. Wagner and Z.M. Dong.
M.D. Gunn, K. Tangemann, J.G. Cyster, S.D. Rosen, and L.T. Williams.
T. Springer.

Lipid Regulators of Cell Function. (Room 33)
S. Corvera, S. Emr, Cochairs
V. Patki and S. Corvera.
S.D. Emr and A.E. Wurmser.
P. Melancon, A. Claude, and J.P. Yan.
A. Siddhanta, Y.G. Chen, C.D. Austin, A. Elgort, and D. Shields.
Y. Zhang, T. Jackson, I. Blader, A. Greenwood, and A. Theibert.
I. Gaidarov, J. Krupnick, J.L. Falck, J.L. Benovic, and J.H. Keen.

Organelle Integrity and Inheritance. (Room 20)
L. Weisman, M. Yaffe, Cochairs
J.P. Luzio, N.A. Bright, B.J. Reaves, C.W. Fearon, S.R. Gray, and B.M. Mullock.
K. Okamoto, S.M. Newman, P.S. Perlman, and R.A. Butow.
U. Acharya, A. Mallabiabarrena, J. Acharya, and V. Malhotra.
L.S. Weisman, N.L. Catlett, and Y.X. Wang.
M.P. Yaffe, K. Berger, H. Fisk, and K. Shepard.
D.T. Shima, N. Cabrera, R. Pepperkok, and G. Warren.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17

SYMPOSIA

AIDS: Progress and Promise. A. Fauci (Chair), NIH, NIAID (Hall C)
Host Factors in the pathogenesis of HIV Disease.
D. Littman, Skirball Inst, New York Univ
Chemokine Receptors and Animal Models for HIV Pathogenesis.
R. Weiss, Inst of Cancer Research, Royal Cancer Hospital
How and Why AIDS Patients Get Cancer.

Morphogenesis(Heinz Herrmann Symposium) (Hall C)
A. McMahon (Chair), Harvard Univ
Sexually Dimorphic Development of the Mammalian Reproductive System Is Regulated by Wnt- Signaling.
J. Kimble, Univ of Wisconsin
Regulation of Morphogenesis and organ formation in C. Elegans.
M. Krasnow, Stanford Univ
Patterning of Airway Branching in Drosophila by FGF.

MINISYMPOSIA

Apoptosis and Cellular Control. (Room 40)
Sponsored by an Educational Grant from the Glaxo Wellcome Research and Development.
V. Dixit, D. Newmeyer, Cochairs
B.B. Zhou, H. Li, J. Yuan, and M.W. Kirschner.
M. Deshmukh, Y. Cheng, J. Werth, J. Cocabo, S. Rothman, D.M. Holtzman, and E.M. Johnson, Jr.
D.W. Andrews, W. Zhu, and B. Leber.
V.M. Dixit.
D.D. Newmeyer.
Y.T. Hsu, K.G. Wolter, C.L. Smith, A. Nechushtan, L. Marrone, X.G. Xi, and R.J. Youle.

Membrane Trafficking: New Paradigms and Directions. (Room 38)
W. Balch, K. Howell, Cochairs
T.B. Reynolds, M.R. Lyons, and T.R. Graham.
G. Liu, L. Thomas, R.A. Warren, M. Sanders, C.C. Cunningham C.A. Enns, J.H. Hartwig, and G. Thomas.
L. Bonfanti, O. Martella, A.A. Mironov Jr., A. Fusella, A.A. Mironov, and A. Luini.
R. Le Borgne and B. Hoflack.
W.E. Balch, M. Aridor, T. Rowe, S. Bannykh, B. Allan, J. Weissman, S. Ho, and H. Plutner.
M.S. Ladinsky, J.R. Kremer, D.N. Mastronarde, J.R. McIntosh, L.A. Staehelin, and K.E. Howell.

Mechanisms of Cell Motility and Cytokinesis. (Room 39)
M. Titus, Y.-L. Wang, Cochairs
U. Henningsen, G. Steinberg, and M. Schliwa.
Y.L. Wang and S.P. Wheatley.
F. Chang.
A. Huttenlocher, S. Palecek, D. Lauffenburger, R. Mellgren, M. Ginsberg, and A. Horwitz.
M.A. Titus.
R.L. DeBiasio, G.M. LaRocca, P.L. Post, and D.L. Taylor.

Signal Transduction in Normal and Malignant Cells. (Room 31)
J.M. Bishop, A. Richmond, Cochairs
T. Harding, X. Li, R. Dy, and H.S. Earp.
A. Richmond.
M. Liyanage, C. Barlow, P.B. Moens, D. Wangsa, C.X. Deng, A. Wynshaw-Boris, and T. Ried.
J. Engelman, C. Wykoff, S. Yasuhara, K. Song, T. Okamoto, and M.P. Lisanti.
R. Kolesnick.
J.M. Bishop.

Protein Degradation. (Room 33)
M. Hochstrasser, J. Ruderman, Cochairs
E.A. Fisher, D.M. Mitchell, M. Zhou, H. Wang, J. Aitchison, and H.N. Ginsberg.
G.L. Lukacs, G. Segal, D. Ferguson, J. Chamberlain, N. Kartner, and F. Zhang.
K. Mori, T. Kawahara, H. Yanagi, and T. Yura.
D. Skowyra, K.L. Craig, M. Tyers, S.J. Elledge, and W. Harper.
M. Hochstrasser.
J. Ruderman, F. Townsley, H. Bastians, and D. Faruggio.

RNA: Untranslated Sequences Controlling Localization, Stability and Differentiation. (Room 20)
J. Keene, R. Singer, Cochairs
R. Wharton, A. Dahanukar, T. Lee, and M. Patterson.
R. Sanchez, Z.F. Wang, T.C. Ingledue, and W.F. Marzluff.
R.M. Long, P. Chartrand, W. Gu, X. Meng, M.R. Schaefer, and R.H. Singer.
J.O. Deshler and B.S. Schnapp.
J. Keerle.
Q. Chen and D. Herring, and P.J. Good.

WICB Announces Annual Meeting Program
COUPLES IN CELL BIOLOGY
Two-career couples with one or both partners in science are becoming very common. While the scientific professions chosen are varied, both the choice and the success in that choice are dramatically influenced by the nature of the couple’s relationship. The relationship faces many issues in common as well as issues quite distinct from relationships without a professional partner in the sciences, whether that partner is a woman or a man. What compromises personally and professionally do parties in such a relationship make? What joys and difficulties, satisfied expectations and maddening disappointments get shared? How do couples keep the relationship successful and fulfilling while pushing forward in science? When and how does the raising of children work into the relationship and the career? These concerns and more will be shared by a panel of two-career couples, one or both of whom are cell biologists. The presentation, sponsored by the Women in Cell Biology Committee, will be moderated by Caroline Kane, University of California, Berkeley, and will take place on Monday, December 15, 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Meeting registrants who are in or out of relationships are encouraged to attend, and to voice questions, concerns, and experiences about Couples in Cell Biology.

 


Do you wonder whether being admitted to graduate school, being awarded your Ph.D.
    10/01/1997

Do you wonder whether being admitted to graduate school, being awarded your Ph.D., being offered an exciting postdoc position, or getting a "real job" was just a mistake on the part of others who will eventually figure that out and expose your inadequacy?

While originally suspected as a problem primarily afflicting women, subsequent studies have made it clear that similar numbers of men also experience impostor feelings.

Those who feel like impostors often believe that many decisions affecting them are made by other people.

Families that impose unrealistic standards, those in which there is only selective validation, or those in which there is much conflict and expressed anger ... put children at risk for developing the impostor phenomenon.

Making the effort to find an effective mentor and assemble a support group for yourself may be the key ... to survival.

... having a mentor is helpful for overcoming the sense of fraudulence.

...those who had attended historically black undergraduate institutions and/or who relied strongly on spiritual beliefs when making decisions about educational or career goals were much less likely to feel like impostors.

 


Gifts
    10/01/1997

The ASCB is grateful to the members below who have given gifts to support Society activities:

Eric Brown
Sylvia Coleman
Susan DiBartolomeis
Joseph Gall
Guido Guidotti
Daryl Hartter
David Kirk
Renato Mascardo
Emma Shelton
Joel Swanson
Holly Thompson
Peggy Weidman
David Weisblat
Katherine Lee Wilson

facebook twitter1 youtube linkedin